Low Launch/Low Spin shaft comparison utilizing S3

Disclaimer – In these following posts I am not promoting nor “Knocking” any particular shaft line or shaft manufacturer. I am simply providing the latest data extracted from the state-of-the-art S3 shaft profiler to more accurately compare certain shafts to one another so that my readers can use their own noggin to make their own individual conclusions. Now I will provide my own opinions and conclusions based on the data provided, but these are only my opinions.  Please also keep in mind that utilizing the modern launch monitors which can precisely detail an individual golfers swing profile (including head speed and acceleration), its still up to the clubfitters knowledge and expertise to accurately pair that golfers swing with the best shaft regardless of price or manufacturer.

Note: if you have certain shafts that you would like to compare please shoot me an email and I will be glad to post a comparison for you.

So in this comparison I just pulled some leading low launch and low spinning shafts to visually see what makes them all so different. I have a particular EI flow that I prefer as some of these shafts can feel quite “boardy” or hard to most golfers. I’ll try to explain

ll1

This is the base line which is both the Tour AD BB and the Diamana W which pretty much look identical. This is a good profile for that stronger golfer who is a bit harder out of the top and needs more stability.
ll1a

Now I throw in the Rogue Silver – Notice how its a bit softer in the butt then stiffer in the mid section. This shaft would produce somewhat similar results but having a softer butt section can give the player more feel through the swing and typically more feel at impact. The stronger mid section also will provide more stability if the player has a nice late release when the shaft whips or kicks during the transition to impact.
ll2

This is a good “tweaner” shaft the Fujikura Fuel Tour spec. Notice how the shaft gets stiffer in the tip and slightly stiffer in the butt. This one you get both feel and stability (for this particular golfer).
ll2a

Now we get a little interesting. I just kept the base line and added the Oban Devotion 6 and the Oban Black. Like I have said before Oban offers some great mid-range prices shafts with exceptional results and this is a good example. Notice how both shafts get stiffer in the butt and stiffer in the tip. Now I throuw in a pretty radical shaft:

ll4

Whoa!!!! Now we start throwing in some exotic materials and crazy shaft design to get this stand-out. I can assure you, this profile you don’t see a lot. I’ll let you derive your own opinion as to what type of golfer would fit this profile.

ll5Lastly I just threw in one of the stiff mid point shafts that I had mentioned above. You will see this bend profile basically being the opposite of the others and geared towards the golfer with a great late (and powerful) release who enjoys a softer tip. Again, I’m just throwing these comparisons out there to show everyone how every shaft is designed to best compliment a certain swing. Its the club-fitters job to properly pair each one. This will also help to illustrate why some of these shafts cost more than others.

 

About Andrew Hodson

I am the youngest with in a golfing family which has spanned three generations. My grandfather started the tradition in England (Bert Hodson-1931 Ryder Cup Team) and has since passed on his knowledge and love of the game. Although I did not follow in the steps of my father and grandfather on a professional golfing level, my love of the game and commitment to accurately fit equipment has only grown. Even as a kid I enjoyed re-gripping clubs which eventually led to refinishing wood heads, re-shafting, and now has culminated in more detailed custom club fitting, building, and repair.